So I’m back in the garden, growing food … but on a much scaled-down version of my former manifestations.

My theme song is “Back in the Saddle.” The Areosmith version.

 

 

I think it’s a remake of a cowboy song by Gene Autry, but I remember playing it … a lot in 1976 when it came out on “Rocks.” It’s a very punkish edgy song for its day … but really, I think I mostly listened to it for Steve Tyler yodelling at the end because, really, I don’t think there is enough yodeling in music these days. (It’s at about 3:50 of the video)

It turns out that getting ‘back in the saddle’ in terms of getting back into the garden this spring was really hard. This was because of last year’s drought … which took all the fun out of growing food.

I don’t mean to belabor the concept of mild PTSD, because I do not want to marginalize people who have experienced war and really traumatic experiences. But mine was a real slow burn, dragged out sort of trauma. Every day, for 5 months, I had to spend the day in a place that was really under stress. My sandy soil was parched by June and I only had 16 weeks to go … growing enough food for 25 families.

And the heat. Every day was an inferno. Turns out, there is no shade in a good garden. For years I’ve used all these little mental tricks to try and ignore heat in the garden … but seriously, after 90 days of scorching temperatures they start to wear down.

So basically, on the last day of last year’s CSA I walked away from the garden and didn’t go back in. I’m sure you’ve read all the articles and books about how important it is to clean up the dead stuff each fall because that’s where the pests live. Nope, not last year. And you want to remove all those wooden stakes you have delineating rows so you can move hoses around for irrigation. You know …   so you don’t hit them with the truck next winter when they’re frozen and you’re driving a load of horse manure in. Nope, but duly noted … pulling out stakes in the fall would have been a good idea.

So this spring, not only was I not really into getting back in the saddle, the saddle needed waaaayyyy more work than it does most springs. And I’ve got two grandkids now. And I’m back doing websites full-time to earn a living.

But I started a little at time. Cleared up a section of tomato stakes and dead plants. Rototilled a bit here. Spread some manure there.

Then it was time to put up the chicken wire fencing I use for peas, which is way more work upfront but which really improves production. And as I was doing it I was thinking … hmmm … I guess I’m actually going to be able to eat some of these peas this year. And maybe shell enough to actually freeze some for next winter. We love frozen peas. And maybe my grandson will be here when they’re in full production and we can hang out in the pea patch eating fists full. Is there anything tastier in the world than a pea right out of the pod off the vine?

And so the darkness that was last year’s garden has slowly started to lift. This weekend I got more stuff planted, some kale, lettuce, my first rows of sacrificial potatoes. It’s starting to feel good finally.

There are a number of gardens and areas of the main garden that will be fallow this year. Well, maybe it’s not technically fallow. I have rototilled them and I’m planting them with a green manure, buckwheat. If I just left a field to sit, it would turn green really fast, with weeds. That would be fine until they went to seed, which just makes the following year even more problematic for planting. I will probably cut down the buckwheat just as it starts to flower, then rototill that back into the soil. With so many areas in buckwheat this year I may leave one to flower … and then go to seed .. and see how bad the “buck-WEEDS” are next year. It’s fun to think about experimenting, and letting some of the gardens recharge. I have pushed them pretty hard for 5 years.

I always have weeds, and this year will be one of the worst because I could not stay on top of them last year because I spent all my time irrigating … and trying to keep moving in the heat which was effort enough. Even with a drought, weeds will always find some moisture in your soil.

And then this spring has been the ultimate kick in the head, with endless, limitless, never-ending, record breaking rain. The basement flooded once with the spring snow melt and drained by itself after several weeks. Then the rains started and reflooded the basement deeper than it’s ever flooded before. And I must remind new readers that when you live off the grid, you simply do not have enough electricity to run a sump pump 24 hours a day to drain your basement. I did purchase a gas water pump last summer for irrigation, but I just cannot bring myself to drain our basement and spew CO2 with it.

After a few weeks the basement drained again, and now it has some water on the floor again because of the rain that just won’t stop. Really nature? No rain last summer for 5 months and now endless rain? Are you being passive aggressive? Mean-spirited? Ironic?

Let me be perfectly clear, as a Canadian it is my constitutional right to complain about the weather … I think. All I’m asking is for a bit of compromise in terms of rain.

I am happy that the joy of growing food has returned. I guess you really just have to get back on that bike after you fall off. Turned out this wasn’t an easy process after the a mentally and physically grueling summer of drought while running a CSA. I have put myself on the “DL” (Disabled List in baseball parlance) in terms of earning an income from growing food for a while. Turns out it can be pretty rough to do manually on a small, labor intensive scale. If mother nature helps with some rain, it is much easier.

I already miss spending my days in the garden. I do not miss working all day every day in the sun and heat watching my plants struggle. Poor Jasper wonders where I disappear to every day when I head to my home-office. He liked it better when he could sit in the shade of the pines and monitor me in the garden waiting for his next meal. Life is tough for some dogs. Not that I’m jealous or anything.